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Intel invests US$1billion in AI to "make the impossible possible”

20 Sep 17

Intel is a company that has an optimistic and pragmatic view of AI’s impact on society, jobs and daily life, believing that it will mimic other profound transformations – from the industrial to the PC revolutions.

Intel's belief is that AI will bring significant, new opportunities to transform business - from retail to healthcare to manufacturing - and have an immensely positive impact on society.

AI will make the impossible possible: advancing research on cancer, Parkinson’s disease, brain disorders; helping to find missing children, and furthering scientific efforts in climate change, space exploration and oceanic research.

To drive AI innovation, Intel is making strategic investments spanning technology, R&D and partnerships with business, government, academia and community groups.

It is deeply committed to unlocking the promise of AI: conducting research on neuromorphic computing, exploring new architectures and learning paradigms.

It has also invested in startups like Mighty AI, Data Robot, and Lumiata through its Intel Capital portfolio and have invested more than US$1billion in companies that are helping to advance artificial intelligence.

Brian Kzranich, Intel CEO, believes Intel will be the AI platform of choice, offering unmatched reliability, performance, security and integration. 

“We are 100% committed to creating the roadmap of optimised products to support emerging mainstream AI workloads.”

AI solutions require a wide range of power and performance to meet application needs.

To support the sheer breadth of future AI workloads, businesses will need unmatched flexibility and infrastructure optimisation so that both highly specialised and general purpose AI functions can run alongside other critical business workloads.

The Intel Nervana AI portfolio aims to deliver that with:

  • Intel Xeon Scalable family – providing highly scalable processors for evolving AI workloads and our purpose-built silicon for the most intensive deep learning training codenamed “Lake Crest”
  • Intel MobileEye – vision technologies for specialised use cases such as active safety and autonomous driving
  • Intel FPGAs – programmable accelerators for deep-learning inference
  • Intel Movidius – low-power vision technology provides machine learning at the edge

“AI is still in its infancy and as the space evolves we’ll continue to advance disruptive approaches in compute that support the complex workloads of today and tomorrow,” says Kzranich.

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