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Intel releases 8th gen vPro mobile processors

24 Apr 2019

Intel has announced the 8th Gen Intel Core vPro mobile processors, based on Intel’s Whiskey Lake architecture.

vPro clients configured with Intel Wi-Fi 6 (Gig+) solutions will be some of the first available in the marketplace to enable faster Wi-Fi 6 connections. 

The company is also launching the Intel Hardware Shield technology, which delivers out-of-the-box protection to help defend against firmware attacks. 

Intel Hardware Shield helps ensure your OS runs on legitimate hardware and provides hardware to software security visibility, enabling the OS to enforce a more complete security policy with no additional IT infrastructure required.

Compared to a 3-year-old PC, the latest 8th Gen Intel Core vPro i7-8665U processor delivers up to 65% faster overall performance and up to 11 hours of battery life. 

New Intel Optane memory H10 with solid-state storage enables two times faster launch of documents, spreadsheets and presentations while transferring large files compared to the same system with a traditional SSD. 

“The Intel vPro platform offers best-in-class performance to drive employee productivity, built-in security technologies to help protect businesses, remote manageability to help lower operational costs and better stability to help decrease computing disruptions,” says Intel Corporation business client platforms general manager and client computing group vice president Stephanie Halford. 

“The Intel vPro platform is built for business. As an established leader in business PC computing, Intel is committed to solving complex customer pain points in an ever-changing work environment.”

Intel is working with OEMs like Dell, HP, Lenovo, Panasonic and others to bring new corporate designs to market. 

PCs built on the 8th Gen Intel Core vPro mobile processors will be rolling out over the next several months.

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