Story image

Tech predicted to have biggest impact on future - over increased equality

10 Oct 2017

Kiwis believe technological innovation will have the most positive influence on the future over the next 20 years.

In a survey commissioned by Vodafone Group, almost a fifth of respondents put technological innovation at the top of a list.

This was followed by changes to societal culture, including greater diversity and greater equality at 18%, and climate change initiatives at 11%.

The survey, which took place in 14 countries, shows that New Zealanders are more optimistic about the future than those living in Australia or the UK.

However, India was by far the most optimistic, with 78% of respondents saying they believe the standard of living there would be better in 20 years’ time.

Vodafone New Zealand consumer director Matt Williams says the way that technology helps us connect is evolving rapidly.

“There are very good reasons to be optimistic about the future with emerging innovations in science and technology already having a profoundly positive impact on society.”

“Vodafone has a proud history of bringing new technologies to hundreds of millions of people worldwide and we think the future of technology is very exciting. Our focus now is to ensure our customers are ready to make the most of it,” adds Williams.

In addition, Vodafone also commissioned the Futerra consultancy to identify 10 of the top emerging trends that could transform home and working life, which include:

  • 3D printed components for housing construction, with 4D printed components that evolve over time as families' accommodation requirements change
  • A five-fold increase in global power generation capacity as clean energy such as solar panels are extended from rooftops to windows, walls and even some highways
  • Personalised medical interventions such as 3D bio-printing of organs and limbs
  • New public transportation systems connecting cities with trains running at up to 600mph (966kph)
  • large-scale water capture projects, including precipitation harvesting, groundwater replenishment and improved desalination, transforming the lives of 1.2 billion people in water-constrained areas
  • A tripling of connected sensor usage in farming leading to increased food yields coupled with the development of new protein sources that increasingly displace meat.
TechOne bringing solar lights to students in need
The company is partnering with charity SolarBuddy to bring solar-powered lights to children in energy poverty to alleviate study stress after dark.
Universal Robots aims for A/NZ growth with new hire
Peter Hern takes on the role of leading customer support, sales and partner development for Universal Robots in Australia and New Zealand.
Microsoft urges organisations to tackle data blindspots
Despite significant focus placed on CX transformation, over a third of Australian organisations claimed that more than one in five of their projects failed.
Raising the stakes: McAfee’s predictions for cybersecurity
Security teams and solutions will have to contend with synergistic threats, increasingly backed by artificial intelligence to avoid detection.
How big data can revolutionise NZ’s hospitals
Miya Precision is being used across 17 wards and the emergency department at Palmerston North Hospital.
Renesas develops 28nm MCU with virtualisation-assisted functions
The MCU features four 600 megahertz CPUs with a lock-step mechanism and a large 16 MB flash memory capacity.
Exclusive: Ping Identity on security risk mitigation
“Effective security controls are measured and defined by the direct mitigation of inherent and residual risk.”
CylancePROTECT now available on AWS Marketplace
Customers now have access to CylancePROTECT for AI-driven protection across all Windows, Mac, and Linux (including Amazon Linux) instances.