Story image

The global enterprise getting Kiwi kids into coding

06 Dec 2017

Accenture is a global professional services enterprise that provides solutions across a range of sectors, including consulting, digital, strategy and operations.

The company has around 425,000 staff serving customers across more than 120 countries.

And this week, Accenture employees across 55 of these countries have pledged to volunteer more than 10,000 hours to Hour of Code. This will see the staff leading coding tutorial sessions with the aim of igniting students’ interest in computer science.

New Zealand is one of the counties on the list, with a number of sessions taking place at Te Papa in Wellington.

Sessions including Coding for Teachers and Coding for Everyone. Students from Paraparaumu School participated in a session yesterday at Te Papa.

Hour of Code was launched in 2013 by Code.org, a non-profit organisation focused in expanding access to computer science and increasing participation by women and underrepresented minorities in computer science.

Paul Daugherty, Accenture’s chief technology & innovation officer and ‘chief coder’, comments, “Technology is creating jobs that didn’t even exist five years ago and learning to code can transform the trajectory of a student’s life and career.”

“As part of our commitment to working with Code.org to prepare young people for the digital economy, Accenture employees last year dedicated more than 10,000 hours to Hour of Code, inspiring more than 100,000 students around the world to learn basic coding skills.”

“We’ve seen the impact that Code.org is having on students and this year we’re doing more to support that - more hours and more classroom sessions to spark an interest in working with the technologies of tomorrow.”

Moreover, as part of this year’s Hour of Code collaboration, Accenture executives will lead Hour of Code activities around the world. Among the executives participating are:

  • Yves Bernaert, a senior managing director with Accenture Technology, will host students at Station F, a start-up incubator in Paris.
  • Jo Deblaere, Accenture’s chief operating officer, will host students for an Hour of Code event at the Accenture office in Amsterdam.
  • Ambe Tierro, a senior managing director in the Philippines, will host students at the Accenture Liquid Studio in Manila.
  • Mohan Sekhar, a senior managing director in the Accenture Technology Centers in India, will host students at an Accenture office in Bangalore.
  • Christy Sovereign, Minneapolis office senior managing director, will be participating in a special Hour of Code event working with student athletes to learn about the future of technology and sports, including a special session on how to build and fly a drone.

What the future of fibre looks like in NZ
The Commerce Commission has released its emerging views paper on the rules, requirements and processes which will underpin the new regulatory regime for New Zealand’s fibre networks.
Gen Z confidence in the economy is on the decline
Businesses need to work hard to improve their reputations.
Why NZ businesses have less than two years to adopt digital before disruption hits
Research found that digital disruption is already impacting two-thirds of New Zealand organisations.
Dell EMC launches interactive AI Experience Zones
The AI Experience Zones are designed to educate visitors about how to start, identify, and implement an AI project.
What NZ can learn from the Baltimore cyberattack
“Businesses must control physical access to their computers and secure their networks."
Infratil seeks clearance to acquire up to 50% stake in Vodafone NZ
The commission will give clearance to a proposed merger if they are satisfied that the merger is unlikely to have the effect of substantially lessening competition in a market.
Hands-on review: MiniTool Power Data Recovery Software
I came across a wee gem of advice when researching the world of data recovery. As soon as you get that sinking feeling and realise you’ve lost a file, stop using your computer.
Deepfakes the 'next wave of concern' - but can law really stomp it out?
Enforcing the existing law will be difficult enough, and it is not clear that any new law would be able to do better. Overseas attempts to draft law for deepfakes have been seriously criticised.