Story image

Intel aims to bring AI to the masses with the Neural Compute Stick 2

21 Nov 18

Intel recently announced the Intel Neural Compute Stick 2 (Intel NCS 2) designed to build smarter AI algorithms and for prototyping computer vision at the network edge. 

Based on the Intel Movidius Myriad X vision processing unit (VPU) and supported by the Intel Distribution of OpenVINO toolkit, the Intel NCS 2 affordably speeds the development of deep neural networks inference applications while delivering a performance boost over the previous generation neural compute stick. 

The Intel NCS 2 enables deep neural network testing, tuning and prototyping, so developers can go from prototyping into production leveraging a range of Intel vision accelerator form factors in real-world applications.

Bringing computer vision and AI to the Internet of Things (IoT) and edge device prototypes is supposedly easy with the enhanced capabilities of the Intel NCS 2.

What looks like a standard USB thumb drive hides much more inside. The Intel NCS 2 is powered by the latest generation of Intel VPU – the Intel Movidius Myriad X VPU. 

This is the first to feature a neural compute engine – a dedicated hardware neural network inference accelerator delivering additional performance. 

Intel corporate vice president Naveen Rao says, “The first-generation Intel Neural Compute Stick sparked an entire community of AI developers into action with a form factor and price that didn’t exist before. 

“We’re excited to see what the community creates next with the strong enhancement to compute power enabled with the new Intel Neural Compute Stick 2.”

Combined with the Intel Distribution of the OpenVINO toolkit supporting more networks, the Intel NCS 2 offers developers greater prototyping flexibility. 

Additionally, thanks to the Intel AI: In Production ecosystem, developers can now port their Intel NCS 2 prototypes to other form factors and productise their designs.

With a laptop and the Intel NCS 2, developers can have their AI and computer vision applications up and running in minutes. 

The Intel NCS 2 runs on a standard USB 3.0 port and requires no additional hardware, enabling users to seamlessly convert and then deploy PC-trained models to a wide range of devices natively and without internet or cloud connectivity.

The first-generation Intel NCS, launched in July 2017, has fueled a community of tens of thousands of developers, has been featured in more than 700 developer videos and has been utilised in dozens of research papers. 

Now with greater performance in the NCS 2, Intel is empowering the AI community to create even more ambitious applications.

How your enterprise backup solution could fail
Even the best-trained employees are prone to error, and unfortunately, sometimes those errors affect enterprise backups.
How businesses will pivot AI strategies to align with human-centric goals
AI will not only allow businesses to reduce costs but will also provide ROI to the staff working with the technology. 
HubSpot announces fund for 'customer first' startups
HubSpot is pouring US$30 million (NZ$40 million) into a new fund to support startups that demonstrate ‘customer first’ approach of not only growing bigger, but growing better.
Commerce Commission report shows fibre is hot on the heels of copper
The report shows that as of 30 September 2018 there were 668,850 households and businesses connected to fibre, an increase of 45% from 2017.
Mac malware on WatchGuard’s top ten list for first time
The report is based on data from active WatchGuard Firebox unified threat management appliances and covers the major malware campaigns.
Using blockchain to drive transparency across the supply chain
"With blockchain, it’s likely we’ll see an increase in trust between organisations that work together through the supply chain."
Why businesses are struggling to reach digital maturity
Approximately 65% of respondents identified that they have yet to reach 'expert' status in their digital transformation maturity.
Bin 'em: Those bomb threat emails are complete hoaxes
A worldwide spate of spam emails claiming there is a bomb in the recipient’s building is almost certainly a hoax.