Story image

InternetNZ: Telco Bill will protect fair broadband prices after 2020

08 Aug 17

The first reading of the Telecommunications (New Regulatory Framework) Amendment Bill is set to occur in mid-August.

Communications Minister Simon Bridges announced the bill this morning.

The purpose of the bill is to amend the 2001 Telecommunications Act by establishing a regulatory framework for fibre fixed line access services and to remove unnecessary copper fixed line access service regulation.

Moreover, the bill sets out to provide more regulatory oversight of retail service quality.

InternetNZ welcomes this milestone and says getting this legislation right is vital to making sure all New Zealanders have cost effective access to excellent broadband.

The draft legislation released by the Government gives the Commerce Commission and industry players the chance to prepare for the implementation with the new framework taking effect from 1 January 2020.

InternetNZ’s chief executive Jordan Carter says the new framework should secure the high-speed broadband access New Zealand needs and at fair prices.

Based in Wellington, InternetNZ is a not-for-profit organisation that aims to protect and promote New Zealand’s Internet.  

"As expected, this bill sets out the new framework to regulate copper and fibre broadband networks, and gives the Commerce Commission important new powers that will help assure the quality of service people get from broadband providers,” comments Carter.

"The removal of regulation from copper networks where fibre ones are built will allow the regulatory framework to remain simple and efficient. The proposed regulated code for copper withdrawal will protect consumers as they transition to fibre broadband.”

"One remaining concern with this draft legislation is the choice of so-called ‘anchor products’ - a broadband product at a specified price designed to influence prices across all broadband products.”

“We think the Government has selected too slow a product for this function and we will propose an alternative as part of the select committee process," says Carter.

InternetNZ says it will analyse the draft legislation in detail, and prepare submissions for Parliament’s Commerce Select Committee to consider.

WatchGuard’s eight (terrifying) 2019 security predictions
The next evolution of ransomware, escalating nation-state attacks, biometric hacking, Wi-Fi protocol security, and Die Hard fiction becomes reality.
Rimini Street hits NZ shores with new subsidiary
The third-party support provider for Oracle and SAP has opened a new Auckland-based office and appointed Sean Jones as NZ senior account executive.
Why the adoption of SAP is growing among SMEs
Small and medium scale enterprises are emerging as lucrative end users for SAP.
Exclusive: How the separation of Amazon and AWS could affect the cloud market
"Amazon Web Services is one of the rare companies that can be a market leader but remain ruthlessly innovative and agile."
HPE extends cloud-based AI tool InfoSight to servers
HPE asserts it is a big deal as the system can drive down operating costs, plug disruptive performance gaps, and free up time to allow IT staff to innovate.
Digital Realty opens new AU data centre – and announces another one
On the day that Digital Realty cut the ribbon for its new Sydney data centre, it revealed that it will soon begin developing another one.
A roadmap to AI project success
Five keys preparation tasks, and eight implementation elements to keep in mind when developing and implementing an AI service.
The future of privacy: What comes after VPNs?
"75% of VPN users said they are seeking a better solution for cloud networks."