Story image

NVIDIA introduces HGX-2, fusing HPC and AI computing

NVIDIA recently introduced NVIDIA HGX-2, the first unified computing platform for both artificial intelligence and high-performance computing. 

The HGX-2 cloud server platform, with multi-precision computing capabilities, supposedly provides unique flexibility to support the future of computing. 

It allows high-precision calculations using FP64 and FP32 for scientific computing and simulations, while also enabling FP16 and Int8 for AI training and inference. 

This unprecedented versatility meets the requirements of the growing number of applications that combine HPC with AI. 

A number of leading computer makers today shared plans to bring to market systems based on the NVIDIA HGX-2 platform. 

HGX-2-serves as a “building block” for manufacturers to create some of the most advanced systems for HPC and AI. 

It has achieved record AI training speeds of 15,500 images per second on the ResNet-50 training benchmark and can replace up to 300 CPU-only servers. 

It incorporates such breakthrough features as NVIDIA NV Switch interconnect fabric, which seamlessly links 16 NVIDIA Tesla V100 Tensor Core GPUs to work as a single, giant GPU delivering two petaflops of AI performance. 

The first system built using HGX-2 was the recently announced NVIDIA DGX-2. 

HGX-2 comes a year after the launch of the original NVIDIA HGX-1, at Computex 2017. 

The HGX-1 reference architecture won broad adoption among the world’s leading server makers and companies operating massive data centres, including Amazon Web Services, Facebook and Microsoft. 

OEM, ODM Systems Expected Later This Year Four leading server makers, Lenovo, QCT, Supermicro and Wiwynn announced plans to bring their own HGX-2-based systems to market later this year. 

HGX-2 is a part of the larger family of NVIDIA GPU-Accelerated Server Platforms, an ecosystem of qualified server classes addressing a broad array of AI, HPC and accelerated computing workloads with optimal performance. 

Supported by major server manufacturers, the platforms align with the data centre server ecosystem by offering the optimal mix of GPUs, CPUs and interconnects for diverse training (HGX-T2), inference (HGXI2) and supercomputing (SCX) applications. 

Customers can choose a specific server platform to match their accelerated computing workload mix and achieve best-in-class performance.

Check Point announces integration with Microsoft Azure
The integration of Check Point’s advanced policy enforcement capabilities with Microsoft AIP’s file classification and protection features enables enterprises to keep their business data and IP secure, irrespective of how it is shared. 
Blockchain: New Zealand needs to get up to speed
"The technology can traverse every business domain and can have far reaching impacts on society as we know it."
Why AI will be procurement’s greatest ally
"AI can help identify emerging suppliers, technologies and products in specific categories."
Five key ways an IT professional can keep their body and mind healthy
Sitting in the same place facing an artificially lit screen for 6-8 hours a day can have a negative impact on your overall health if you don’t offset it with diet and exercise.
Are AI assistants teaching girls to be servants?
Have you ever interacted with a virtual assistant that has a female-based voice or look, and wondered whether there are implicitly harmful gender biases built into its code?
Google 'will do better' after G Suite passwords exposed since 2005
Fourteen years is a long time for sensitive information like usernames and passwords to be sitting ducks, unencrypted and at risk of theft and corruption.
Commission warns Spark for misleading in-contract customers
The warning follows an investigation into representations Spark made on its website and in emails in August and September 2018.
Optic Security Group celebrates Axis accolade
Auckland-based business security systems provider Fortlock has picked up an award at Axis Communications’ annual Oceania Axis Partner Summit 2019.