Story image

Workplace by Facebook: Can the social media giant convince IT decision makers?

11 Oct 2016

Workplace by Facebook is now officially available to any business or institute that wants to use it.

The platform, previously known as Facebook at Work, has been in beta for more than a year, with several organisations including RBS, Yes Bank, Danone, Telekom Austria Group, Financial Times, Telenor, and Booking.com on board.

Facebook described the new offering as “a communications platform that helps organisations collaborate and get more done.” According Richard Edwards, analyst at Ovum, Facebook now has to convince business and IT decision makers that this new offering if different and/or better than other social platforms already on the market.

A digital medium to connect every employee

“The world’s workforce is not homogenous. Every country and every industry presents a different workforce mix,” Edwards says.

“Information technology solutions, including electronic communication and collaboration systems, have traditionally targeted the knowledge worker segment and, more recently, service workers through enterprise mobility initiatives,” he explains.

“Manual workers have, for the most part, been left out of the loop because they are not “digitally connected” to the workplace, its processes, and its communication channels. However, affordable smartphones, pervasive wireless networks, and powerful cloud services are now able to connect the millions of manual workers employed in agriculture, accommodation and food, transport and storage, wholesale and retail, construction, and manufacturing,” he says.

Facebook is designed to be used by everyone, says Edwards.

“Millions of people use Facebook each and every day to stay in touch with family and friends, and the company will no doubt be hoping its new venture will be equally successful,” he says.

“A communications platform that helps organisations collaborate and get more done, Workplace is for everyone to use, not just the white collar workers at the company HQ,” says Edwards.

Edwards says if business leaders can harness the Facebook ‘secret sauce’ to drive up employee engagement, then all are likely to benefit.

“Engaged employees are generally more productive, more innovative, and more collaborative; engaged employees typically deliver better customer service, have less time off work, and make fewer mistakes; and engaged employees have a better sense of well-being and contentment,” he explains.

According to Edwards, employee engagement requires energy, commitment, and authentic consideration at every level within the business, and in the digital age, a digital medium is required to channel these efforts.

“There are many enterprise social networking products on the market, and Ovum is currently producing a detailed report that examines seven popular solutions, so Facebook will have to convince business and IT decision-makers that its new offering is different and/or better than the likes of Jive, Yammer, Chatter, Socialcast, IBM Connections, SAP Jam, and MangoApps,”he says.

“Of course, no one uses any of these solutions in their personal lives, so maybe that will make a difference.”

Check Point announces integration with Microsoft Azure
The integration of Check Point’s advanced policy enforcement capabilities with Microsoft AIP’s file classification and protection features enables enterprises to keep their business data and IP secure, irrespective of how it is shared. 
Blockchain: New Zealand needs to get up to speed
"The technology can traverse every business domain and can have far reaching impacts on society as we know it."
Why AI will be procurement’s greatest ally
"AI can help identify emerging suppliers, technologies and products in specific categories."
Five key ways an IT professional can keep their body and mind healthy
Sitting in the same place facing an artificially lit screen for 6-8 hours a day can have a negative impact on your overall health if you don’t offset it with diet and exercise.
Are AI assistants teaching girls to be servants?
Have you ever interacted with a virtual assistant that has a female-based voice or look, and wondered whether there are implicitly harmful gender biases built into its code?
Google 'will do better' after G Suite passwords exposed since 2005
Fourteen years is a long time for sensitive information like usernames and passwords to be sitting ducks, unencrypted and at risk of theft and corruption.
Commission warns Spark for misleading in-contract customers
The warning follows an investigation into representations Spark made on its website and in emails in August and September 2018.
Optic Security Group celebrates Axis accolade
Auckland-based business security systems provider Fortlock has picked up an award at Axis Communications’ annual Oceania Axis Partner Summit 2019.